In-Race Strategy

The final In-Race Strategy is a culmination of all the analysis.

The race is broken down in to four key areas which are actually calculated in reverse, from the race’s finish back to its start.

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In-Race Strategy

The final In-Race Strategy is a culmination of all the analysis.

The race is broken down in to four key areas which are actually calculated in reverse, from the race’s finish back to its start.

Call 0141 816 9595

or Please Fill in the Form Below

In-Race Strategy

The final In-Race Strategy is a culmination of all the analysis.

The race is broken down in to four key areas which are actually calculated in reverse, from the race’s finish back to its start.

Call 0141 816 9595

or Please Fill in the Form Below

in-race-strategy

The in-race strategy will tell you:

1. At what point on the home straight should the final burst ideally begin in order to win the race;

2. Where in the pack and on the course you need to be at the point at which you start that final run;

3. How to get to that point while having used the least amount of energy possible in the earlier stages of the race; and

4. What to do at the starting gun to secure the pack position you need.

If your horse has a swift turn of foot but that only lasts for 100 yards, then there is no point in starting your run at the two-furlong pole.

And if your horse is a one-pace grinder with endless stamina, and can run at top speed for three furlongs or more, then you shouldn’t only just be starting your run when there’s a mere 100 yards to go.

If your horse has a swift turn of foot but that only lasts for 100 yards, then there is no point in starting your run at the two-furlong pole.

And if your horse is a one-pace grinder with endless stamina, and can run at top speed for three furlongs or more, then you shouldn’t only just be starting your run when there’s a mere 100 yards to go.

There is also no point in finding yourself boxed in on the rail, caught behind a wall of horses or having to run on the slowest ground up to the finish, when you should be making your ideal winning run.

If your horse has a swift turn of foot but that only lasts for 100 yards, then there is no point in starting your run at the two-furlong pole.

And if your horse is a one-pace grinder with endless stamina, and can run at top speed for three furlongs or more, then you shouldn’t only just be starting your run when there’s a mere 100 yards to go.

There is also no point in finding yourself boxed in on the rail, caught behind a wall of horses or having to run on the slowest ground up to the finish, when you should be making your ideal winning run.

It is not only essential to know when your final burst needs to begin, but also where you need to be on the course and in the pack at that very moment – and, of course, how to get there.

This may all sound obvious. However, there’s a widespread belief that being “in the van” is the best place. That’s an incorrect tactic that tends to lose horses many more races than it wins. Most of the positions that jockeys put their horses into don’t even offer an aerodynamic benefit, so they really provide no advantage and simply serve to make winning more difficult.

Another factor we will consider is how important the early position is and whether it is worth using up irreplaceable energy to achieve. At some distances, like at Chester for instance, the early position is essential to winning the race; but at most courses, it is most definitely not.

Pack aerodynamics change for every race and the faster they go, the more important the drag factor becomes. Which direction the wind is coming from and how strong it is, unlikely as it may sound, also makes a massive difference.

But if you sacrifice a leading position for the benefits of being in the pack, how far back is too far back? Some positions may be better for reducing drag, but they may not be worth striving for, because you will only find yourself too far back and will simply finish the race with energy to spare.

In some circumstances, the better strategy could be to run on good ground, even if that means you have no cover from other horses.

Alternatively, perhaps you should seek to run on good ground only if you can get cover from one other horse who’s also taking this route.

PRE-ENTRY ANALYSIS

Natural run style analysis
Course for horse matching
Perfect distance assessment
Preferred Going suggestion

PRE-RACE PLANNING

Draw Bias plan
Race Pace Strategy
Competitor analysis
Wind & weather plan

COURSE FACTORS

Best Ground Analysis
Ideal Route plan
3D undulation mapping
Combined race calculation

IN-RACE STRATEGY

Race Start strategy
Pack Aerodynamics
Race finish strategy
Plan B for in-race issues

Take Advantage of a FREE Pre-Entry Analysis ​

For a limited period, we’re offering Trainers an absolutely FREE Pre-Entry Analysis for your first Horse!

This service is usually valued at £100.

All you’re required to do is send a quick message saying “FREE Pre-Entry analysis” and your horse’s name.

We then deliver our recommendations for the perfect distance, the best course, ideal draw, optimal in-race positioning & preferred going to significantly increase your horse’s winning chances.

Take Advantage of a FREE Pre-Entry Analysis ​

For a limited period, we’re offering Trainers an absolutely FREE Pre-Entry Analysis for your first Horse!

This service is usually valued at £100.

All you’re required to do is send a quick message saying “FREE Pre-Entry analysis” and your horse’s name.

We then deliver our recommendations for the perfect distance, the best course, ideal draw, optimal in-race positioning & preferred going to significantly increase your horse’s winning chances.